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'White Fang' Quotes

'White Fang' Quotes

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White Fang is one of the most well-known works by Jack London, an American author. He's famous for his works set in the wild--where Nature plays a prominent role in the never-ending struggle for survival. White Fang The story takes place in Yukon Territory, Canada, during the Klondike Gold Rush at the end of the 19th-century. Here are a few quote from the book.

White Fang Quotes
  • "White Fang knew the law well: to oppress the weak and obey the strong." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 3, Chapter 5
  • "White Fang was glad to acknowledge his lordship, but it was lordship based upon superior intelligence and brute strength." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 3, Chapter 5
  • "There were deeps in his nature which had never been sounded. A kind word, a caressing touch of the hand, on the part of Gray Beaver, might have sounded these deeps; but Gray Beaver did not caress nor speak kind words. It was not his way." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 3, Chapter 5
  • "Food and fire, protection and companionship, were some of the things he received from the god. In return, he guarded the god's property, defended his body, worked for him, and obeyed him." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 3, Chapter 5
  • "This was a female of his kind, and it was a law of his kind that the males must not fight the females. He did not know anything about this law, for it was no generalization of the mind, not a something acquired by experience in the world. He knew it as a secret prompting, as an urge of instinct - of the same instinct that made him howl at the moon and starts of nights and that made him fear death and the unknown." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 3, Chapter 6
  • "One cannot violate the promptings of one's nature without having that nature recoil upon itself." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 4, Chapter 1
  • "Every urge of his being impelled him to spring upon the pack that cried at his heels, but it was the will of the gods that this should not be; and behind the will, to enforce it, was the whip of caribou-gut with its biting thirty-foot lash." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 4, Chapter 1
  • "Much of the Wild had been lost, so that to them the Wild was the unknown, the terrible, the ever menacing and ever warring. But to him, in appearance and action and impulse, still clung the Wild." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 4, Chapter 1
  • "And so, fresh from the soft southern world, these dogs, trotting down the gang-plank and out upon the Yukon shore, had but to see White Fang to experience the irresistible impulse to rush upon him and destroy him. They might be town-reared dogs, but the instinctive fear of the Wild was theirs just the same." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 4, Chapter 1
  • "In short, Beauty Smith was a monstrosity, and the blame of it lay elsewhere. He was not responsible. The clay of him had been moulded in the making." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 4, Chapter 2
  • "They were his environment, these men, and they were moulding the clay of him into a more ferocious thing than had been intended by Nature. Nevertheless, Nature had given him plasticity. Where many another animal would have died or had its spirit broken, he adjusted himself and lived, and at no expense of the spirit." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 4, Chapter 3
  • "The bulldog's method was to hold what he had, and when opportunity favored to work in for more. Opportunity favored when White Fang remained quiet. When White Fang struggled, Cherokee was content merely to hold on." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 4, Chapter 4
  • "He did not want to bite the hand, and he endured the peril of it until his instinct surged up in him, mastering him with its insatiable yearning for life." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 4, Chapter 5
  • "The hand descended. Nearer and nearer it came. It touched the ends of his upstanding hair. He shrank down under it. It followed down after him, pressing more closely against him. Shrinking, almost shivering. He still managed to hold himself together. It was a torment, this hand that touched him and violated his instinct. He could not forget in a day all the evil that had been wrought him at the hands of men." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 4, Chapter 6
  • "This expression of abandon and surrender, of absolute trust, he reserved for the master alone." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 5, Chapter 3
  • "The Wild still lingered in him and the wolf in him merely slept." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 5, Chapter 4
  • "He was a ferocious man. He had been ill-made in the making. He had not been born right, and he had not been helped any by the moulding he had received at the hands of society. The hands of society are harsh, and this man was a striking sample of its handiwork. He was a beast." - Jack London, White Fang, Part 5, Chapter 5

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